Monday, 11 July 2016

The Jones Family Part VI: Kapunda Community and Railway



1860 'KAPUNDA.', South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1867), 19 May, p. 1.
(Supplement to the South Australian Weekly Chronicle.), viewed 11 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90251543



In late 1859 Thomas JONES transferred his licence for the Blenheim hotel to Henry DOWNER. Thomas, Theophila and the five kids moved from Adelaide to Kapunda.  There they took over the Sir John Franklin Hotel. My great great grandmother Elizabeth would have been nearly 9 years old. Kapunda looked like it was starting to bounce back after hard times, the railway opened that year to great fanfare as well as a new post office and telegraph station. Lots of new shops and hotels opened. Kapunda was predominantly a mining town with rich copper deposits, there were also nearby quarries of marble and bluestone.


Main Street, Kapunda 1871
State Library of South Australia  [B 19714/45]


Early History of the Sir John Franklin Hotel


The Sir John Franklin hotel Kapunda was built around 1849 with James Wittaker applying for a publican’s licence that year. It was named after Tasmania’s first governor and arctic explorer Sir John Franklin. The hotel had 7 furnished rooms and more waiting to be furnished. It was a large and extensive premises. Despite this the application was denied, with a publican licence being granted to John Bickford of the North Kapunda Arms, arguing that the town could only support one public house. There must have been some kind of appeal or change of heart because James Wittaker was granted a general publican licence only two months later in December. Perhaps it had something to do with the town having cracked down on the many storekeepers selling and producing sly grog.


A bullock wagon hauling wheat sacks past the Sir John Franklin Hotel, Kapunda, approx 1900
State Library of South Australia [B 16395]


About 10 years later in May 1860 Thomas Rowlands and Theophila JONES began their business at the Sir John Franklin Hotel in Kapunda. Thomas and Theophila set to work, renovating rooms and aimed to make it the best hotel outside of Adelaide.



1860 'Classified Advertising', The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889),
27 June, p. 1. , viewed 11 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1206502


A Paucity of Leaches


Life in Kapunda was hard in 1860, there had been outbreaks of sickness attributed to poor sanitation in the town. In the late 1850s there had been a bit of a slump in property sales, there was not much money in the town. In the Jones family's first month in Kapunda, a child the son of Joseph Tuckfield drowned when he fell into a hole that had filled with water.
 A man named Mr. Small fell from his horse when jumping a log and due to a “paucity of leeches” townsfolk were unable to tell whether his arm was broken or dislocated. 
Whilst renovating the Sir John Franklin hotel one of the front windows was smashed and the front chain separating the footpath from the road was stolen. Thomas Jones offered a reward of £5 in the hope the offender would be “nabbed”.

On the 13th April 1860 Kapunda was shaken by a small earthquake. It was enough to knock over wine glasses and shake items on tables.

Local Community


Thomas involved himself in community activities. He was on the committee for the Mechanics’ Institute, was a member of the Freemasons and he joined the local Cricket Club when it formed in 1862. Looking at some of the scores I take a guess that he was a better bowler than batsman. 
He was a judge for the Kapunda Agricultural and Horticultural Show for Wine, Fruit, and Flowers. At the 1861 show he won a prize for his onions, third prize for his Sow and first prize for his Ham. The society’s dinner was held at the Sir John Franklin hotel where a large group of gentlemen enjoyed a dinner that was “in every way excellent” and they enjoyed a dessert that included some of the best fruit that had been exhibited at the show that day. At the end of the evening, a toast was proposed to the Host and Hostess. Mr. Jones returned his thanks and the party broke up at around midnight.

Volunteer Riflemen


Thomas JONES was part of the Adelaide Marksmen/Rifle club and the German Rifle Club and had been part of a committee trying to establish a mounted rifle force. He continued his interest when he moved to Kapunda. There was a strong movement at the time for volunteer militia and mounted riflemen in the colony. The Kapunda Rifles were issued with their first uniforms in 1860. They had “grey Sydney tweed trousers, with red stripe, also a blue coat with red facings, and cap bearing the initials K. V.”

South Australian Volunteer Forces 1860
State Library of South Australia [B 5592]

The Northern Brigade was formed, made up of the small rifle brigades in the region. They would meet for shooting competitions sometimes at nearby Bakers Flat, and would often have functions at the Sir John Franklin. Thomas Rowlands Jones was still considered one of the best shots in the colony, and won rifles and money in competitions. He acted as scrutineer at some competitions, inspecting the targets to determine a winner.

In July of 1860 at the Sir John Franklin, a meeting took place to form the Northern volunteer corps, bringing several volunteer brigades together. The volunteers began drilling in preparation for the opening of the new railway in Kapunda. Unfortunately, the Angus Park group were not going as well as others. Some of the Angus Park “Germans were so insubordinate and careless” that Captain Connor had to take their arms and uniforms and give them to Greenock who were showing great zeal.

Railway to Kapunda


With the construction of the railway in 1860, it seemed as though the town’s prospects were starting to improve. A new post office and telegraph office were constructed and many other businesses started to spring up.

In June 1860 a group of about half a dozen members of parliament were invited by the Commissioner of Public Works to inspect the progress of the train line to Kapunda. The day before the outing it was found that numbers had bumped up to 20, arrangements for dinner at the Sir John Franklin hotel had to be promptly changed. On the morning of the outing at the Gawler train station it was found that around 30 members of parliament from both houses had arrived with their friends and officials, so a telegram to the Sir John Franklin had to be quickly sent to arrange dinner for 40.

On the journey, they inspected the line, bridges, cuttings, causeways and stations under construction. Some of the passengers on the outing had very little experience of train travel. The curves and cuttings through the hills as they approached the river Light were a cause of apprehension for many of them. The bridge over the river Light was not yet completed so the passengers had to disembark at that point. The party began to break up and it was a smaller group of ministers and officials that were left to inspect the progress at the Kapunda station. Once it was time for dinner the Kapunda locals were excited to see so many politicians in town so “several Kapunda gentlemen, about 50 in all” joined the party for a “substantial dinner”. “The tables were loaded with the good things of this life.”[i] Having worked in the hospitality industry I think it is amazing that Thomas and Theophila were able to throw together such a large impromptu dinner. The party drank to the health of Her Magesty and His Excellency and enjoyed lively songs during their meal. On the party’s return journey home they were joined by several hundred of the workmen that had been working on the line, also heading home for the weekend.

“Happy in the prospect of revisiting their hearthstones after a week’s labor upon one of the most simply grand and useful productions of modern ingenuity and skill.”[ii]

On the 10th of August 1860 a group of about 35 people were invited to inspect the soon to open line between Gawler and Kapunda. The group arrived by special train and were treated to a meal and entertainment at the Sir John Franklin Hotel. It was reported that:

“ the company, whose appetites were whetted by the long trip and the bracing air of a delightful day, did ample justice to Host Jones's liberal catering and exquisite cuisine.”


On Monday the 13th of August 1860 the Northern Extension line to Kapunda was finally officially opened. A train left Adelaide with 13 carriages with around 600 passengers for the event. The line was opened by the Governor and there were many parliamentarians along for the event.

“A very large proportion of the passengers were ladies, and we venture to say that never before has Kapunda been the receptacle of such a galaxy of beauty and fashion.”[iii]

The train left Adelaide at 10:30am with cheers from the large crowd of spectators that had gathered. All of the stations along the line were decorated with evergreens, flowers and flags and crowds gathered to wave and cheer at the train.

They picked up another 52 passengers at Gawler and attached another engine. The group were uneasy with the twists and turns before the river Light, but were amazed at the marvels of modern engineering. They stopped at the Bridge over the River Light to inspect its construction and then went on to arrive at Kapunda at 1:17pm. 

Kapunda Railway Station Approx 1907
State Library of South Australia [B 11985]


The lovely Kapunda Station was built using locally mined bluestone. It was also decorated with evergreens and flags for the occasion. His Excellency Sir Richard G MacDonnell Governor in Chief of Her Majesty’s Provence of South Australia was greeted by the Reverend Mr Oldham, and the Captains of the Angaston and Kapunda Rifles. The Kapunda Rifle Corp were there with about 50 members and accompanied by their band. They formed a guard of honour. After some speeches, the Governor proceeded to a crane which he himself used, to symbolically load the first bale of wool and the first bag of copper ingots onto the train. The vice-regal party then were taken by carriage to the Sir John Franklin hotel amid a salute fired by the Kapunda Blacksmiths’ Artillery Company. The main street was decorated with flags, mottos, and garlands of evergreen. At the Sir John Franklin the Governor received visitors until it was time to leave for a great banquet at Crase’s rooms at the North Kapunda Hotel (a rival hotel to the Sir John Franklin). There they had many speeches and toasts. The return train to Adelaide left at 5:30pm, but had to go back when they realised they had left the vice-regal party behind, in all it was only a 5 minute delay and the train arrived safely back in Adelaide at around 8pm.

Also...

Also in August of 1860 William Hislop an employee of Thomas JONES at the Sir John Franklin, was given two 1£ notes to get change. William took his chances, ran off with the money and did not return. Perhaps he used the new train as a getaway? He was caught by police in Adelaide and sentenced to three months gaol.

In December 1860 a large crowd at the Sir John Franklin hotel enjoyed the entertainment of Mr Henry Julian Hall, polyphonist. I have found an advertisement from a show he did in New Zealand which is handy as a description for what the show may have been like.


1862, Page 1 Advertisements Column 6
Daily Southern Cross, Volume XVIII, Issue 1531, 19 June 1862, Page 1,
 
http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&d=DSC18620619.2.2.6


Expanding Family

On the 2nd of August 1861 Thomas and Theophila welcomed the arrival of their son Horace Foley JONES, born in Kapunda.


Next Time


Next blog post will be about a downturn in fortune for the Jones' Sir John Franklin Hotel in Kapunda, Explorer mania, and a new business venture.



1860 'Classified Advertising', The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), 27 June, p. 1. , viewed 18 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1206502
1860 'KAPUNDA.', South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1867), 19 May, p. 1. (Supplement to the South Australian Weekly Chronicle.), viewed 28 Mar 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90251543
1860 'BENCH OF MAGISTRATES.', South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 16 March, p. 2. , viewed 19 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49896527
1859 'BENCH OF MAGISTRATES.', Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), 17 September, p. 3. , viewed 27 Mar 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158129706
1849 'NEW GENERAL PUBLICANS' LICENCES.', South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 12 September, p. 4. , viewed 18 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50247760
1849 'LAW AND POLICE COURTS. BENCH OF MAGISTRATES.', Adelaide Times (SA : 1848 - 1858), 13 December, p. 3. , viewed 18 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article206981635
1849 'BENCH OF MAGISTRATES.', South Australian Gazette and Mining Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1847 - 1852), 14 June, p. 4. , viewed 18 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article195937869
Wikipedia contributors, 'Kapunda', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 27 April 2016, 11:02 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kapunda&oldid=717386196> [accessed 17 June 2016]
1860 'KAPUNDA.', The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), 21 May, p. 3. , viewed 08 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1205447
1860 'KAPUNDA.', South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 14 April, p. 3. , viewed 18 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49889180
1860 'KAPUNDA.', South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 29 August, p. 3. , viewed 10 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50025446
1862 'KAPUNDA.', South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 27 March, p. 3. , viewed 10 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article40468355
1861 'THE KAPUNDA AGRICULTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY'S ANNUAL EXHIBITION.', Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), 2 March, p. 2. (Supplement to the Adelaide Observer.), viewed 10 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158179484
1861 'KAPUNDA AGRICULTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY'S ANNUAL EXHIBITION.', South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 28 February, p. 3. , viewed 10 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50018869
1860 'KAPUNDA.', South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1867), 12 May, p. 2. , viewed 11 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90251807
1861 'THE VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT.',South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 26 March, p. 5. , viewed 19 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50021708
1866 'KAPUNDA.', South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 30 July, p. 3. , viewed 18 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-
1860 'INSPECTION OF THE NORTHERN EXTENSION RAILWAY.', The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), 21 June, p. 3. , viewed 08 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1206326
1860 'THE RAILWAY TO KAPUNDA',Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), 23 June, p. 7. , viewed 08 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158175712
1860 'KAPUNDA.', South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 10 August, p. 3. , viewed 18 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50026032article41019946
1860 'INSPECTION OF THE NORTHERN LINE BETWEEN GAWLER AND KAPUNDA.', South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 11 August, p. 2. , viewed 19 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50024439
1860 'OPENING OF THE KAPUNDA RAILWAY.', South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1867), 18 August, p. 5. , viewed 11 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90250769
1860 'OPENING OF THE RAILWAY FROM GAWLER TO KAPUNDA.', Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), 18 August, p. 3. , viewed 11 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158176484
1860 'OPENING OF THE RAILWAY FROM GAWLER TO KAPUNDA.', South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 14 August, p. 2. , viewed 11 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50025627
1860 'LOCAL COURTS.', South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), 28 August, p. 3. , viewed 18 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50023301
1860 'OPENING OF THE KAPUNDA RAILWAY.', The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), 14 August, p. 3. , viewed 08 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article822747
Birth Index South Australia, Horace Foley Jones.

[i] 1860 'THE RAILWAY TO KAPUNDA',Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), 23 June, p. 7. , viewed 08 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158175712
[ii] 1860 'INSPECTION OF THE NORTHERN EXTENSION RAILWAY.', The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), 21 June, p. 3. , viewed 08 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1206326
[iii] 1860 'OPENING OF THE KAPUNDA RAILWAY.', South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1867), 18 August, p. 5. , viewed 11 Jul 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90250769

4 comments:

  1. Brilliant research. I am getting to know a lot more about my great great grandmother and great great grandfather. Thank you

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  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  3. Hi there Rebecca
    Im working on a history project and i have come across your great great grandfather Thomas George Smith and i am doing some research on him and his involvement and i would love to share it with you in the future especially as you have such a keen interest in history and your families history. I came across your name and your connection to him in my research.
    sincerely
    Donna Abdulla

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    1. Hi Donna,
      Thank you so much for getting in contact with me. I would love to read your research. What is your history project about?
      Cheers Rebecca

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